We were all born as spontaneous, creative thinkers.  Yet a great deal of our education may be regarded as the inculcation of mind sets.  We were taught how to handle problems and new phenomena with fixed mental attitudes (based on what past thinkers thought) that predetermine our response to problems or situations.  Typically, we think on the basis of similar problems encountered in the past.  When confronted with problems, we fixate on something in our past that has worked before.  Then we analytically select the most promising approach based on past experiences, excluding all other approaches, and work within a clearly defined direction toward the solution of the problem.

Our Rutted Paths Of Thinking
Once we think we know what works or can be done, it becomes hard for us to consider alternative ideas.  We tend to develop narrow ideas and stick with them until proven wrong.  Following is an interesting experiment, which was originally conducted by the British psychologist Peter Watson, demonstrating the way we typically process information.  Watson would present subjects with the following three numbers in sequence:

2 ... 4 ... 6 ...

He would then ask subjects to explain the number rule for the sequence and to give other examples of the rule.  The subjects could ask as many questions as they wished without penalty.

He found that almost invariably most people will initially say, "4, 6, 8" or some similar sequence.  And Watson would say, "Yes, that is an example of a number rule."  Then they will say, "20, 22, 24" or "50, 52, 54" and so on --- all numbers increasing by two.  After a few tries, and getting affirmative answers each time, they are confident that the rule is numbers increasing by two without exploring alternative possibilities.

Actually, the rule Watson was looking for is much simpler; it is simply numbers increasing.  They could be 1, 2, 3 or 10, 20, 40 or  400, 678, 10,944.  And testing such an alternative would be easy.  All the subjects had to say was "1, 2, 3" to Watson to test it and it would be affirmed.  Or, for example, a subject could throw out any series of numbers, for example, 5, 4, 3 to see if they got a positive or negative answer.  And that information would tell them a lot about whether their guess about the rule is true.

The profound discovery Watson made was that most people process the same information over and over until proven wrong, without searching for alternatives, even when there is no penalty for asking questions that give them a negative answer.  In his hundreds of experiments, he, incredibly, never had an instance in which someone spontaneously offered an alternative hypotheses to find out if it were true.  In short, his subjects didnít even try to find out if there is a simpler or even, another, rule.

Creative Geniuses Think Differently
Creative geniuses donít think this way.  The creative genius will always look for a multiplicity of ways to approach a subject.  It is this willingness to entertain different perspectives and alternative approaches that broadens their thinking and opens them up to new information and the new possibilities that the rest of us donít see.  Einstein was once asked what the difference was between him and the average person.  He said that if you asked the average person to find a needle in a haystack, the person would stop when he or she found a needle.  He, on the other hand, would tear through the entire haystack looking for all possible needles.

When Charles Darwin first set to solve the problem of evolution, he did not analytically settle on the most promising approach to natural selection and then process the information in a way that would exclude all other approaches. Instead, he initially organized his thinking around significant themes, principally eight, of the problem, which gave his thinking some order but with the themes connected loosely enough so that he could easily alter them singly or in groups.  His themes helped him capture his thoughts about evolutionary change by allowing him to reach out in many alternative directions at once and pulling seemingly unrelated information into a coalescent body of thought.

Darwin used his themes to work through many points that led to his theory of evolution by helping him to comprehend what is known and to guide in the search for what is not yet known.   He used them as a way of classifying the relation of different species to each other, as a way to represent the accident of life, the irregularity of nature, the explosiveness of growth, and of the necessity to keep the number of species constant.  Over time, he rejected some of his themes --- the idea of direct adaptation, for instance.  Some were emphasized --- the idea of continuity.  Some were confirmed for the first time --- the idea that change is continuous.  Some were recognized --- the frequency of variation.  By adjusting and altering the number of themes and connections, Darwin was able  to keep his thought fluid and to bring about adaptive shifts in his thinking.  He played the critic, surveying his own positions; the inventor, devising new solutions and ideas; and the learner, accumulating new facts not prominent before.

The Lotus Blossom Brainstorming Technique
The point is that by organizing his thinking around loosely-connected themes, Darwin expanded his thinking by inventing alternative possibilities and explanations that, otherwise, may have been ignored.  A creative thinking technique that will help you expand your thinking in a similar fashion is Lotus Blossom, which was originally developed by Yasuo Matsumura of Clover Management Research in Chiba City, Japan.  The technique helps you to diagrammatically mimic Darwinís thinking strategy by organizing your thinking around significant themes.  You start with a central subject and expand into themes and sub-themes, each with separate entry points.  In Lotus Blossom, the petals around the core of the blossom are figuratively "peeled back" one at a time, revealing a key component or theme.  This approach is pursued in ever-widening circles until the subject or opportunity is comprehensively explored.  The cluster of themes and surrounding ideas and applications, which are developed in one way or another, provide several different alternative possibilities.  The guidelines for Lotus Blossom are:

  1. Write the central problem in the center of the diagram.

  2. Write the significant themes, components or dimensions of your subject in the circles labeled A to H surrounding the central theme.  The optimal number of themes for a manageable diagram is between six and eight.  If you have more than eight, make additional diagrams.  Ask questions like: What are my specific objectives?  What are the constants in my problem?  If my subject were a book, what would the chapter headings be?  What are the dimensions of my problem?

  3. Use the ideas written in the circles as the central themes for the surrounding lotus blossom petals or boxes.  Thus, the idea or application you wrote in Circle A would become the central theme for the lower middle box A.  It now becomes the basis for generating eight new ideas or applications.

  4. Continue the process until the lotus blossom diagram is completed.

An Example: How To Add Value To Your Organization
Suppose, for example, you want to create more value for your organization by increasing productivity or decreasing costs.  You would write "Add Value" in the center box.  Next, write the  eight most significant areas in your organization where you can increase productivity or decrease costs in the circles labeled A to H that surround your central box.  Also write the same significant areas in the circles with the corresponding letters spread around the diagram.  In my example, I selected the themes "suppliers," "travel expenses," "partnerships," "delivery methods," "personnel," "technology," "facilities," and "evaluation."  Also write the same significant areas in the circles with the corresponding letters spread around the diagram.  For instance, in the sample diagram the word "technology" in the circle labeled A, serves as the theme for the lower middle group of boxes.  Each area now represents a  theme that ties together the surrounding boxes.

For each theme, try to think of eight ways to add value.  Phrase each theme as a question to yourself.  For example, ask, "In what ways might we use technology to increase productivity?" and "In what ways might we use technology to decrease expenses?"  Write the ideas and applications in the boxes numbered 1 through 8 surrounding the technology theme.  Do this for each theme.  Think of eight ideas or ways to make personnel more productive or ways to decrease personnel expenses, eight ideas or ways to create more value for your delivery methods, your facilities and so on.  If you complete the entire diagram, youíll have 64 new ideas or ways to increase productivity or decrease expenses.

When you write your ideas in the diagram, youíll discover that ideas continually evolve into other ideas and applications, as ideas seem to flow outward with a conceptual momentum all their own.

An important aspect of this technique is that it shifts you from reacting to a "static" snapshot of the problem and will encourage you to examine the significant themes of the problem and the relationships and connections between them.  Sometimes when you complete a diagram with ideas and applications for each theme, a property or feature not previously seen will emerge.  Generally, higher level properties are regarded as emergent --- a car, for example,  is an emergent property of the interconnected parts.  If a car were disassembled and all the parts were thrown into a heap, the property disappears.  If you placed the parts in piles according to function, you begin to see a pattern and make connections between the piles that may inspire you to imagine the emergent property --- the car, which you can then build.  Similarly, when you diagram your problem thematically with ideas and applications, it enhances your opportunity to see patterns and make connections.  The connections you make between the themes and ideas and applications will sometimes create a emergent new property or feature not previously considered.